Legal & Regulatory

To bring jobs and opportunity back to Louisiana, the state needs to ensure a friendly, fair, and legally consistent legal and regulatory environment. Louisiana’s history of litigation abuse and government red tape continues to stifle opportunities for job seekers and working families to find good-paying jobs as businesses flee Louisiana for states with fairer, more predictable policies. Louisiana’s burdensome regulations and state government overreach only hinders our ability to create quality jobs for hard-working Louisiana families. Regulatory reform that limit strict government oversight is necessary to prevent jobs and opportunity from fleeing Louisiana to neighboring states currently experiencing economic booms.

Lawsuit Abuse is Killing Jobs and Opportunity in Louisiana

Lawsuit Abuse is Killing Jobs and Opportunity in Louisiana

Lawsuit abuse is killing jobs and driving away economic opportunity for working families and job seekers in Louisiana. Many have been saying this for years, but we wanted to explore whether there was really a direct link between lawsuit abuse and the economic downturn and, if so, how big of an impact it is making....

By Daniel J. Erspamer

Vaping Regulations Would Stifle Opportunity for Louisianans

Vaping Regulations Would Stifle Opportunity for Louisianans

This week, the Pelican Institute joined groups around the country in signing a letter opposing efforts by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ban flavored e-cigarette or vaping products. Although there has been concerns over the recent health scares relating to these products, in all cases, the immediate health damage has been due to...

Happy Constitution Day!

Happy Constitution Day!

September 17th is a historic day. On this date in 1787, the delegates of the Constitutional Convention met for the last time and signed our nation’s governing document, and then it was sent to the states for approval.  The seven Articles comprising of 4,543 words that make up the Constitution, outlined how our nation should be...

“I’ll take ‘Potent Potables’ for $500, Alex.”

“I’ll take ‘Potent Potables’ for $500, Alex.”

Louisiana has a long and storied history when it comes to its alcohol. The state that gave Bourbon its name and claims to have invented the cocktail has been a Mecca for those looking to enjoy its potent potables. But today, thanks to outdated laws on craft breweries, Louisiana is in danger of becoming stuck...

LAWSUIT ABUSE AND NEEDLESS REGULATIONS ARE HOLDING LOUISIANA BACK, PELICAN INSTITUTE SAYS

LAWSUIT ABUSE AND NEEDLESS REGULATIONS ARE HOLDING LOUISIANA BACK, PELICAN INSTITUTE SAYS

As Louisiana lawmakers seek to make our state more inviting to job creators and seekers, there are two areas in desperate need of addressing – Louisiana’s abysmal legal and regulatory structures. From overreaching occupational licensing laws to predatory state-sanctioned litigation against the state’s largest job creators, legal and regulatory issues continue to stifle hard-working Louisiana...

SCOTUS Upholds St. Tammany Landowners’ Rights in Dusky Frog Case

SCOTUS Upholds St. Tammany Landowners’ Rights in Dusky Frog Case

The big case over the “little frog that might” and the federal government’s encroachment on private property rights got its day in court. Yesterday, the Supreme Court of the United States announced a unanimous decision affirming the rights of St. Tammany Parish property owners over federal regulators and remanded the case to the lower courts....

The Little Frog That Might

The Little Frog That Might

The Little Frog That Might Once upon a time there lived a small frog in Louisiana that adorably covers its eyes when exposed to bright light or other threats (kind of like a Gremlin). This little frog, whose mating call has been likened to human snoring, is at the center of a big fuss ever since...

Occupational Licensing In Louisiana: Anti-Job, Anti-Growth

Occupational Licensing In Louisiana: Anti-Job, Anti-Growth

Onerous Licensing Laws in Louisiana Licensing laws in Louisiana have always been onerous. We are, after all, the only state in the union that licenses florists. That bears repeating: we are the only state in the U.S. that has the dubious distinction of demanding that florists be a licensed profession. Why is this? Well, often...

By Ellen Carmichael

Louisiana Ranked Worst for State Lawsuit Climate

Louisiana Ranked Worst for State Lawsuit Climate

A recent survey from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has identified Louisiana as the worst state in the nation for lawsuit climate. What that means is that businesses are being scared away from Louisiana by the threat of lawsuits.

By Ellen Carmichael

Louisiana Breweries Are Being Harmed By Regulations

Louisiana Breweries Are Being Harmed By Regulations

The Brewers Association, a beer industry non-profit, has ranked Louisiana 48th out of the 50 states for breweries per capita in a recent report. This is not for lack of love for beer, but because Louisiana's regulatory and tax environment for breweries is unfavorable. We've set the wrong incentives, that is all, and it is easy enough to fix

By Ellen Carmichael

Levee Breach Lawsuit Illustrates Class Action Racket

Levee Breach Lawsuit Illustrates Class Action Racket

This case is a stunning example of class action lawyers doing what they do best: using lawsuits to create the illusion of relief that will ultimately do nothing more than increase their own bottom lines.

By Robert Ross

Guest Commentary: Lawsuit Reform in the 2014 Legislative Session

Guest Commentary: Lawsuit Reform in the 2014 Legislative Session

The Louisiana Legislature kicked off the 2014 regular session last week, beginning a series of discussions about the most important issues facing the state. Already it is clear that lawsuit reform will be front and center in the debate.

By Robert Ross

It’s Time to Lay This Case to Rest

It’s Time to Lay This Case to Rest

To put it simply, offering families a less inexpensive burial option allowed grieving families to make an economical and dignified choice in a time of need and great stress.

By Sarah Harbison